Summary-Virtual Memory




Summary

It is desirable to be able to execute a process whose logical address space is larger than the available physical address space. Virtual memory is a technique that enables us to map a large logical address space onto a smaller physical memory. Virtual memory allowr s us to run extremely large processes and to raise the degree of multiprogramming, increasing CPU utilization. Further, it frees application programmers from worrying about memory availability. In addition, with virtual memory, several processes can share system libraries and memory.

Virtual memory also enables us to use an efficient type of process creation known as copy-on-write, wherein parent and child processes share actual pages of memory. Virtual memory is commonly implemented by demand paging. Pure demand paging never brings in a page until that page is referenced. The first reference causes a page fault to the operating system.

The operating-system kernel consults an internal table to determine where the page is located on the backing store. Tt then finds a free frame and reads the page in from the backing store. The page table is updated to reflect this change, and the instruction that caused the page fault is restarted. This approach allows a process to run even though its entire memory image is not in main memory at once. As long as the page-fault rate is reasonably low, performance is acceptable.

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We can use demand paging to reduce the number of frames allocated to a process. This arrangement can increase the degree of multiprogramming (allowing more processes to be available for execution at one time) and—in theory, at least—the CPU utilization of the system. It also allows processes to be run even though their memory requirements exceed the total available physical memory Such processes run in virtual memory. If total memory requirements exceed the physical memory, then it may be necessary to replace pages from memory to free frames for new pages.

Summary-Virtual Memory

 Various page-replacement algorithms are used. FIFO page replacement is easy to program but suffers from Belady's anomaly.

Optimal page replacement requires future knowledge.

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 LRU replacement is an approximation of optimal page replacement, but even it may be difficult to implement. Most page-replacement algorithms, such as the second-chance algorithm, are approximations of LRU replacement. In addition to a page-replacement algorithm, a frame-allocation policy is needed. Allocation can be fixed, suggesting local page replacement, or dynamic, suggesting global replacement.

The working-set model assumes that processes execute in localities. The working set is the set of pages in the current locality. Accordingly, each process should be allocated enough frames for its current working set. If a process does not have enough memory for its working set, it will thrash. Providing enough frames to each process to avoid thrashing may require process swapping and scheduling. Most operating systems provide features for memory mapping files, thus allowing file I/O to be treated as routine memory access.

The Win32 API implements shared memory through memory mapping files. Kernel processes typically require memory to be allocated using pages that are physically contiguous.

The buddy system allocates memory to kernel processes in units sized according to a power of 2, which often results in fragmentation. Slab allocators assign kernel data structures to caches associated with slabs, which are made up of one or more physically contiguous pages. With slab allocation, no memory is wasted due to fragmentation, and memory requests can be satisfied quickly. In addition to requiring that we solve the major problems of page replacement and frame allocation, the proper design of a paging system requires that we consider page size, I/O, locking, prepaging, process creation, program structure, and other issues.

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