Introduction to Database Security Issues






Frequently Asked Questions

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Ans: This chapter discusses techniques for securing databases against a variety of threats. It also presents schemes of providing access privileges to authorized users. view more..
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Ans: The typical method of enforcing discretionary access control in a database system is based on the granting and revoking of privileges. Let us consider privileges in the context of a relational DBMS. view more..
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Ans: DBMS typically includes a database security and authorization subsystem that is responsible for ensuring the security of portions of a database against unauthorized access view more..
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Ans: This chapter discusses techniques for securing databases against a variety of threats. It also presents schemes of providing access privileges to authorized users. view more..
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Ans: Object databases is the power they give the designer to specify both the structure of complex objects and the operations that can be applied to these objects view more..
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Ans: XML (Extensible Markup Language)—has emerged as the standard for structuring and exchanging data over the Web. XML can be used to provide information about the structure and meaning of the data in the Web pages rather than just specifying how the Web pages are formatted for display on the screen view more..
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Ans: A database schema, along with primary key and foreign key dependencies, can be depicted by schema diagrams. view more..
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Ans: A query language is a language in which a user requests information from the database. view more..
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Ans: All procedural relational query languages provide a set of operations that can be applied to either a single relation or a pair of relations. view more..
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Ans: An object database is a database management system in which information is represented in the form of objects as used in object-oriented programming. Object databases are different from relational databases which are table-oriented. Object-relational databases are a hybrid of both approaches. view more..
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Ans: IBM developed the original version of SQL, originally called Sequel, as part of the System R project in the early 1970s. view more..
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Ans: The set of relations in a database must be specified to the system by means of a data-definition language (DDL). view more..
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Ans: The basic structure of an SQL query consists of three clauses: select, from, and where. view more..
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Ans: This chapter discusses techniques for securing databases against a variety of threats. It also presents schemes of providing access privileges to authorized users. view more..
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Ans: The natural join operation operates on two relations and produces a relation as the result. view more..
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Ans: Reason to rename a relation is a case where we wish to compare tuples in the same relation. view more..
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Ans: SQL permits a variety of functions on character strings. Read to know about them. view more..
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Ans: The company is organized into departments. Each department has a unique name, a unique number, and a particular employee who manages the department. We keep track of the start date when that employee began managing the department. A department may have several locations.  A department controls a number of projects, each of which has a unique name, a unique number, and a single location view more..




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