The ns-2 simulator|NETWORK SIMULATIONS: NS-2




The ns-2 simulator

The tool used for much research-level network simulations is ns, for network simulator and originally developed at the Information Sciences Institute. The ns simulator grew out of the REAL simulator developed by Srinivasan Keshav [SK88]; later development work was done by the Network Research Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

We will describe in this chapter the ns-2 simulator, hosted at www.isi.edu/nsnam/ns. There is now also an ns-3 simulator, available at www.nsnam.org. Because ns-3 is not backwards-compatible with ns-2 and the programming interface has changed considerably, we take the position that ns-3 is an entirely different package, though one likely someday to supercede ns-2 entirely. While there is a short introduction to ns-3 in this book (32 The ns-3 Network Simulator), its use is arguably quite a bit more complicated for beginners, and the particular simulation examples presented below are well-suited to ns-2. While ns-3 supports more complex and realistic modeling, and is the tool of choice for serious research, this added complexity comes at a price in terms of configuration and programming. The standard ns-2 tracefile format is also quite easy to work with using informal scripting.

An Introduction to Computer Networks, Release 2.0.4

Research-level use of ns-2 often involves building new modules in C++, and compiling them in to the system. For our purposes here, the stock ns-2 distribution is sufficient. The simplest way to install ns-2 is probably with the “allinone” distribution, which does still require compiling but comes with a very simple install script. (As of 2014, the ns-allinone-2.35 version appeared to compile only with gcc/g++ no more recent than version 4.6.)

The native environment for ns-2 (and ns-3) is Linux. Perhaps the simplest approach for Windows users is to install a Linux virtual machine, and then install ns-2 under that. It is also possible to compile ns-2 under the Cygwin system; an older version of ns-2 may still be available as a Cygwin binary.

To create an ns-2 simulation, we need to do the following (in addition to a modest amount of standard housekeeping).

• define the network topology, including all nodes, links and router queuing rules

• create some TCP (or UDP) connections, called Agents, and attach them to nodes

• create some Applications – usually FTP for bulk transfer or telnet for intermittent random packet generation – and attach them to the agents

• start the simulation

Once started, the simulation runs for the designated amount of time, driven by the packets generated by the Application objects. As the simulated applications generate packets for transmission, the ns-2 system calculates when these packets arrive and depart from each node, and generates simulated acknowledgment packets as appropriate. Unless delays are explicitly introduced, node responses – such as forwarding a packet or sending an ACK – are instantaneous. That is, if a node begins sending a simulated packet from node N1 to N2 at time T=1.000 over a link with bandwidth 60 ms per packet and with propagation delay 200 ms, then at time T=1.260 N2 will have received the packet. N2 will then respond at that same instant, if a response is indicated, eg by enqueuing the packet or by forwarding it if the queue is empty.

Ns-2 does not necessarily require assigning IP addresses to every node, though this is possible in more elaborate simulations.

Advanced use of ns-2 (and ns-3) often involves the introduction of randomization; for example, we will in 31.3 Two TCP Senders Competing introduce both random sliding-windows delays and traffic generators that release packets at random times. While it is possible to seed the random-number generator so that different runs of the same experiment yield different outcomes, we will not do this here, so the randomnumber generator will always produce the same sequence. A consequence is that the same ns-2 script should yield exactly the same result each time it is run.

Using ns-2

The scripting interface for ns-2 uses the language Tcl, pronounced “tickle”; more precisely it is object-Tcl, or OTcl. For simple use, learning the general Tcl syntax is not necessary; one can proceed quite successfully by modifying standard examples.

The network simulation is defined in a Tcl file, perhaps sim.tcl; to run the simulation one then runs the command

ns sim.tcl

 

An Introduction to Computer Networks, Release 2.0.4

The result of running the ns-2 simulation will be to create some files, and perhaps print some output. The most common files created are the ns-2 trace file – perhaps sim.tr – which contains a record for every packet arrival, departure and queue event, and a file sim.nam for the network animator, nam, that allows visual display of the packets in motion (the ns-3 version of nam is known as NetAnim). The sliding-windows video in 8.2 Sliding Windows was created with nam.

Within Tcl, variables can be assigned using the set command. Expressions in [ ... ] are evaluated. Numeric expressions must also use the expr command:

set foo [expr $foo + 1]

 

As in unix-style shell scripting, the value of a variable X is $X; the name X (without the $) is used when setting the value (in Perl and PHP, on the other hand, many variable names begin with $, which is included both when evaluating and setting the variable). Comments are on lines beginning with the ‘#’ character. Comments can not be appended to a line that contains a statement (although it is possible first to start a new logical line with ;).

Objects in the simulation are generally created using built-in constructors; the constructor in the line below is the part in the square brackets (recall that the brackets must enclose an expression to be evaluated):

set tcp0 [new Agent/TCP/Reno]

 

Object attributes can then be assigned values; for example, the following sets the data portion of the packets in TCP connection tcp0 to 960 bytes:

$tcp0 set packetSize_ 960

 

Object attributes are retrieved using set without a value; the following assigns variable ack0 the current value of the ack_ field of tcp0:

set ack0 [$tcp0 set ack_]

 

The goodput of a TCP connection is, properly, the number of application bytes received. This differs from the throughput – the total bytes sent – in two ways: the latter includes both packet headers and retransmitted packets. The ack0 value above includes no retransmissions; we will occasionally refer to it as “goodput” in this sense.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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